Living into Death: a Case for an Iterative, Fortified and Cross-sector Approach to Advance Care Planning

Source: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group Advance care planning (ACP) has been framed as best practice for quality palliative care, yet a growing body of literature affirms the need for an early iterative ACP process to begin when people are young and healthy. A significant gap appears to exist in the literature regarding the utility of death conversations outside the […]

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On May 27, 2019, posted in: News by

Temporal Trends in the Utilisation of Preventive Medicines by Older People: A 9-year Population-based Study

Source: Elsevier Preventive medicines focus on preserving health, preventing diseases and managing the well-being of communities and defined populations (Miettinen, 2014). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated the benefits of prescribing preventive medicines in the general population; however older people are often under-represented in these trials, particularly those aged 65 years and older. Evidence-based guidelines for prescribing preventive medicines are formulated from […]

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On May 27, 2019, posted in: News by

Falls and Depression in Octogenarians – Life and Living in Advanced Age: a Cohort Study in New Zealand

Source: Journal of Primary Health Care New Zealand, like many countries, has an ageing population, with an increasing proportion of people in the older age groups and a declining proportion of children. The population aged 65 years and over has increased from 11% of the total population in 1991 to 13% in 2009 and is expected to reach 21% by 2031. […]

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On May 27, 2019, posted in: News by

Physical Activity Prevalence and Correlates Among New Zealand Older Adults

Source: Journal of Ageing and Physical Activity The world’s aging population has stimulated the need to investigate ‘everyday’ activities that can prolong independence and reduce the impact of aging on health systems and people’s quality of life (World Health Organization, 2015). One example is physical activity, for which the benefits for older adults’ mental, cognitive, and physical health are well-established […]

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On April 29, 2019, posted in: News by

Objective Benefits, Participant Perceptions and Retention Rates of a New Zealand Community-based, Older-adult Exercise Programme

Source: Journal of Primary Health Care Much research has demonstrated the benefits of exercise for older adults.1–3 However, most of these studies have been conducted in hospital or university settings, with relatively few involving existing community-based exercise programmes. While a number of international studies have demonstrated a range of significant functional, health and wellbeing effects of community-based exercise programmes for older adults,4–6 little […]

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On April 29, 2019, posted in: News by

Health Professional Student Education Related to the Prevention of Falls in Older People – A Survey of Universities in Australia and New Zealand

Source: Australian Journal on Ageing Around one-third of people aged over 65 years fall each year. The multifactorial nature of falls means that fall prevention interventions can be delivered by a range of health professionals in a range of settings.  Relevant professionals may include nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, doctors, social workers, optometrists, podiatrists and exercise physiologists. One barrier to widespread implementation of […]

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On April 29, 2019, posted in: News by

Faecal Incontinence in Older  People in Australia and New Zealand: A Narrative Review

Source: Australia & New Zealand Continence Journal The International Continence Society (ICS) defines faecal incontinence (FI) as “the involuntary loss of liquid or solid stool that is a social or hygienic problem”. Anal incontinence encompasses the definition of FI with the addition of involuntary loss of flatus. Older adults in the community and residential aged care in Australia and New Zealand […]

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On March 28, 2019, posted in: News by

How Does it Feel to be a Problem? Patients’ Experiences of Self-management Support in New Zealand and Canada

Source: Wiley Online Library Health systems risk being overwhelmed by the significant impact of long-term conditions – the healthcare equivalent to climate change.” Ongoing illness is affecting a growing number of older people, especially those who are poor and belong to ethnic minorities. Many experience multiple concurrent conditions that require complex care with different treatments and involve a range of various health-care providers. […]

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On March 28, 2019, posted in: News by

Current Bowel Care Practices in Spinal Cord Units in Australia and New Zealand: A Prospective, Cross-sectional Survey

Source: Journal of the Australasian Rehabilitation Nurses Association (JARNA) Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a catastrophic injury that alters the life trajectory of those who are affected by it. Its causes are either traumatic (external events, such as road crashes and falls) or non-traumatic (internal events, such as infection and disease).  Typically, traumatic SCI is an […]

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On March 28, 2019, posted in: News by

A Cross-Sectional Study of Coping Resources and Mental Health of Chinese Older Adults in the United States

Source: Taylor & Francis Online The Asian population is the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012). But they are much less studied compared to African American and Hispanic populations in mental health issues (Kuo, Chong, & Joseph, 2008). As the largest sub-population of Asian Americans, Chinese elderly in the United States have been found […]

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On February 28, 2019, posted in: News by