The Dialogic Educational Pathway as a Strategy of Care with Elderly Women in Sexuality

Source: Esc Anna Nery

Discussions around sexuality, although still fraught with prejudices and prohibitions, have long evoked power relations and denounced strategies of control of the individual and of the population, a characteristic of modern society. It turns out, however, that control and power are asymmetrical in gender relations and sexuality is a strong ally in the normalization of female conduct in all age groups, mediated by the control of man.

Regarding elderly women, the domestication of female behavior in the past decades must be considered, coupled with the conception that the elderlies are asexual. This reality implies insufficient health care in this area and needs to be overcome, since sexuality in aging is usually neglected by health professionals due to the lack of preparation and appreciation of the young, healthy and sexually active body in our culture – reinforcement for the prejudice towards sexuality in aging as well as its wider understanding.


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OnJune 28, 2019, posted in: News by

Risk Reduction of Cognitive Decline And Dementia – WHO Guidelines

Source: World Health Organisation

These new WHO guidelines provide the knowledge base for health care providers, governments, policy-makers and other stakeholders to reduce the risks of cognitive decline and dementia through a public health approach. As many of the risk factors for dementia are 6 shared with those of non-communicable diseases, the key recommendations can be effectively integrated into programmes for tobacco cessation, cardiovascular disease risk reduction and nutrition.


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OnJune 28, 2019, posted in: News by

Restrictive Practices in Residential Aged Care in Australia

Source: Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety (Australia)

The use of restrictive practices in residential aged care in Australia is contentious. There is significant public interest in the issue of restraint and ways to reduce or avoid it. Numerous media reports and inquiries have highlighted accounts of the misuse or overuse of physical restraint and psychotropic medication. This includes personal accounts from members of the public about residents being physically restrained frequently, or for long periods of time, or restrained without consent.

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OnJune 28, 2019, posted in: News by

Living into Death: a Case for an Iterative, Fortified and Cross-sector Approach to Advance Care Planning

Source: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group

Advance care planning (ACP) has been framed as best practice for quality palliative care, yet a growing body of literature affirms the need for an early iterative ACP process to begin when people are young and healthy. A significant gap appears to exist in the literature regarding the utility of death conversations outside the end-of-life context. Could ‘death conversations’ early in life be an effective tool by which doctor and patient can co-construct a more healthful way of life, and realistic relationship with death? And what variables must be taken into account for these conversations to proceed successfully? This paper provides a narrative exploration of the value of death conversations in the clinical context in New Zealand. Five exemplars are discussed, drawn from a sample of 21 semi-structured interviews with young older adults (54–65 years old) not receiving palliative care or diagnosed with a terminal illness. Together, these narratives indicate that further community consultation is required to determine culturally appropriate ways to initiate productive conversations around aging, death and dying and how to build patient/practitioner/family relationships which allow these conversations to happen safely. There is a need to acknowledge the important factor of culture related to age, generation, sex, faith and ethnicity when engaging in conversations about aging, death and dying. By doing so, health professionals will be best equipped to assist their patients to live well into death.

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OnMay 27, 2019, posted in: News by

Temporal Trends in the Utilisation of Preventive Medicines by Older People: A 9-year Population-based Study

Source: Elsevier

Preventive medicines focus on preserving health, preventing diseases and managing the well-being of communities and defined populations (Miettinen, 2014). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated the benefits of prescribing preventive medicines in the general population; however older people are often under-represented in these trials, particularly those aged 65 years and older. Evidence-based guidelines for prescribing preventive medicines are formulated from these RCTs therefore making it difficult to extrapolate the findings to the older population with multimorbidity (Calderon-Larranaga et al., 2012; Iyer, Naganathan, McLachlan, & Le Couteur, 2008). Importantly, evidence-based guidelines are population based and do not take into consideration individual variations, multiple co-morbidities and individual preferences. Hence reviewing the treatment needs of older people taking multiple medicines can be a multifaceted task. Continuing preventive including antithrombotics, cholesterol-lowering medicines and bone preserving agents until the end-of-life potentially increases the likelihood of adverse events (Best Practice Advocacy Centre, 2010).

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OnMay 27, 2019, posted in: News by

Falls and Depression in Octogenarians – Life and Living in Advanced Age: a Cohort Study in New Zealand

Source: Journal of Primary Health Care

New Zealand, like many countries, has an ageing population, with an increasing proportion of people in the older age groups and a declining proportion of children. The population aged 65 years and over has increased from 11% of the total population in 1991 to 13% in 2009 and is expected to reach 21% by 2031. Correspondingly, the number of people aged 65 years and over is projected to increase from ~550,000 in 2009 to 1 million in the late 2020s. The number of people aged 85 years and over is projected to increase from 67,000 in 2009 to 144,000 in 2031, then more than double to ~330,000 by 2061.

Falls in older adults are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly population, and up to one-third of adults aged over 65 years fall yearly; 22–60% of people aged 65+ years are injured yearly from a fall. Falls are the leading cause of injury-related hospitalisation and account for 40% of injury-related deaths.

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OnMay 27, 2019, posted in: News by

Physical Activity Prevalence and Correlates Among New Zealand Older Adults

Source: Journal of Ageing and Physical Activity

The world’s aging population has stimulated the need to investigate ‘everyday’ activities that can prolong independence and reduce the impact of aging on health systems and people’s quality of life (World Health Organization, 2015). One example is physical activity, for which the benefits for older adults’ mental, cognitive, and physical health are well-established (reviewed in Bauman, Merom, Bull, Buchner, & Fiatarone Singh, 2016). According to current evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization (2016) and US Department of Health and Human Services (2008), older adults (aged 65 years and over) can gain notable health benefits by engaging in as little as 2.5 hr of moderate-intensity physical activity (e.g., brisk walking) each week. Guidelines from several other jurisdictions (including New Zealand and The Netherlands) specify further that the 2.5 hr total should be achieved via bouts of at least 30 min of activity on 5 days each week (Government of the Netherlands, 2016; Ministry of Health, 2013).
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OnApril 29, 2019, posted in: News by

Objective Benefits, Participant Perceptions and Retention Rates of a New Zealand Community-based, Older-adult Exercise Programme

Source: Journal of Primary Health Care

Much research has demonstrated the benefits of exercise for older adults.1–3 However, most of these studies have been conducted in hospital or university settings, with relatively few involving existing community-based exercise programmes. While a number of international studies have demonstrated a range of significant functional, health and wellbeing effects of community-based exercise programmes for older adults,4–6 little data is available in New Zealand.

New Zealand–based researchers have developed and evaluated a number of effective older-adult community-based exercise programmes – for example, the Otago Exercise Programme7 and the Green Prescription.8 While these programmes have many benefits for their target populations, they are not necessarily group-based. This is important, as many older adults prefer group activities because they provide opportunities for socialisation in addition to the reported physical benefits.
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OnApril 29, 2019, posted in: News by

Health Professional Student Education Related to the Prevention of Falls in Older People – A Survey of Universities in Australia and New Zealand

Source: Australian Journal on Ageing

Around one-third of people aged over 65 years fall each year. The multifactorial nature of falls means that fall prevention interventions can be delivered by a range of health professionals in a range of settings.  Relevant professionals may include nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, doctors, social workers, optometrists, podiatrists and exercise physiologists. One barrier to widespread implementation of appropriate fall prevention interventions is a lack of knowledge among health professionals about effective strategies. A potential solution lies in the targeted delivery of information regarding fall prevention and management within undergraduate and postgraduate university programs for all health professional students.

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OnApril 29, 2019, posted in: News by

Faecal Incontinence in Older  People in Australia and New Zealand: A Narrative Review

Source: Australia & New Zealand Continence Journal

The International Continence Society (ICS) defines faecal incontinence (FI) as “the involuntary loss of liquid or solid stool that is a social or hygienic problem”. Anal incontinence encompasses the definition of FI with the addition of involuntary loss of flatus. Older adults in the community and residential aged care in Australia and New Zealand were the focus of this review because age is a well-recognised risk factor2. Ageing alters the cellular make-up of the intestinal mucosa and structural changes in the anorectum impair motility. The aim of this review was to describe the current literature pertaining to prevalence, assessment and diagnosis, and well-being of people diagnosed with FI in an Australian and New Zealand context and to compare this with international data.

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OnMarch 28, 2019, posted in: News by