Community-based organisations (OPAs)

Source: HelpAge International

Community based organisations of older people are found throughout South East Asia. These are commonly called older people’s associations (OPAs) however may go by other names in different countries, for example intergenerational self-help groups in Vietnam, and older people’s organisations in the Philippines.

Older people’s associations aim to improve the living conditions for older people and for developing their communities. OPAs utilise the unique resources and skills older people have, to provide effective social support, to facilitate activities and deliver services.

They provide a valuable social protection mechanism which complements existing mechanism to improve the lives of older people.

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OnNovember 22, 2016, posted in: News by

Making a Difference in Dementia: Nursing Vision and Strategy

Source: Department of Health (UK)

The Making a Difference in Dementia: Nursing Vision and Strategy, published in March 2013, set out our vision of how nurses could maximise their unique contribution to high quality, compassionate care and support for people with dementia and their carers/families.

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OnNovember 22, 2016, posted in: News by

World Alzheimer Report 2016: Improving healthcare for people living with dementia

Source: Alzheimer’s Disease International 

This World Alzheimer Report 2016 reviews the state of healthcare for dementia around the world, and recommends ways that it can be improved. There is a clear and urgent need to improve the coverage of healthcare around the world, for people living with dementia now and those who will be in the future.

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OnNovember 22, 2016, posted in: Home page feature, News by

Creating Age-Friendly Cities

Source: Parliamentary Office of Science & Technology (UK)

By 2050, 89% of the UK’s population will live in cities and 24% will be aged over 65.1,2,3 There is increasing recognition that cities should aim to meet the needs of older people and support them to live actively and participate fully in their communities. This POSTnote examines how housing, outdoor spaces and transport can be made more age-friendly. It also highlights challenges for designing and delivering agefriendly cities

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OnNovember 22, 2016, posted in: Home page feature, News by

Future of an ageing population

Source: UK Government Office for Science

This report brings together evidence about today’s older population, with future trends and projections, to identify the implications for the UK. This evidence will help government to develop the policies needed to adapt to an ageing population.

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OnNovember 22, 2016, posted in: Home page feature, News by

Aged care: A quick guide

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

This quick guide provides a brief overview of aged care in Australia. It describes the types of care provided, arrangements for accessing subsidised care, statistics on aged care, the organisations that provide care, and the regulatory arrangements for ensuring quality care. The quick guide does not describe care that is provided outside of the formal aged care system, such as care provided by family members or accommodation in retirement villages

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OnNovember 22, 2016, posted in: News by

Effect of a general practitioner management plan on health outcomes and hospitalisations in older patients with diabetes

Source: Internal Medicine Journal

Little is known about the impact of a general practitioner management plan (GPMP) on health outcomes of patients with diabetes.

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OnNovember 22, 2016, posted in: Home page feature, News by

Judith Davey Blog: Faith-based or Commercial? Promoting social value in aged care

When older people and their families/whanau are looking for aged care they have choices – commercial or voluntary/community sector? If we need residential care would we go for Oceania/BUPA/Ryman or look at Presbyterian Support/Wesleycare/Anglican Living. And what would guide our choices? What makes the difference?

In 2015 the New Zealand Council of Christian Social Services (NZCCSS) published Outcomes Plus.1 This examined the special contribution made by community and voluntary sector social service providers. What do they offer which is unique– their “added value” in other words?

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OnNovember 22, 2016, posted in: By Judith Davey, Home page feature, News by

Launch of books for people with cognitive impairment including dementia

Join Dovetale Press and Bupa at the launch of a set of books for people living with cognitive impairments including dementia.

Reading for many people is one of life’s pleasures – something they may have enjoyed for decades. So why should this stop because of a memory or language impairment? Specifically adapted by Dr Sally Rimkeit and Dr Gillian Claridge, and intended to continue and revive the pure joy of reading.

Date: Thursday 10 November 2016
Time: 6.30pm
Venue: Remuera Room, Ellerslie Event Centre, 80 Ascot Ave, Ellerslie

RSVP to communications@bupa.co.nz by 3 November.

 

View flyer here >

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OnOctober 31, 2016, posted in: Gerontology Events, Home page feature by

Physical and social environmental changes to promote walking among Dutch older adults in deprived neighbourhoods – the NEW.ROADS study

Source: BMC Public Health

Physical activity is important for healthy ageing, and daily walking is
seen as a feasible way to be active at older ages. Yet, many older persons, particularly in lower socioeconomic groups and residing in deprived neighbourhoods, are insufficiently active. Creating a physical and social neighbourhood environment that is more supportive for walking has the potential to improve walking behaviour. Current evidence of the impact of changes to the physical and/or social environmental on walking behaviour is scarce. The aim of the NEW.ROADS study is to design, implement and evaluate changes to the physical and social environment for the purpose of increasing walking behaviour among older residents of deprived neighbourhoods.

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OnOctober 21, 2016, posted in: News by