Future of an ageing population

Source: UK Government Office for Science

This report brings together evidence about today’s older population, with future trends and projections, to identify the implications for the UK. This evidence will help government to develop the policies needed to adapt to an ageing population.

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OnNovember 22, 2016, posted in: Home page feature, News by

Aged care: A quick guide

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

This quick guide provides a brief overview of aged care in Australia. It describes the types of care provided, arrangements for accessing subsidised care, statistics on aged care, the organisations that provide care, and the regulatory arrangements for ensuring quality care. The quick guide does not describe care that is provided outside of the formal aged care system, such as care provided by family members or accommodation in retirement villages

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OnNovember 22, 2016, posted in: News by

Effect of a general practitioner management plan on health outcomes and hospitalisations in older patients with diabetes

Source: Internal Medicine Journal

Little is known about the impact of a general practitioner management plan (GPMP) on health outcomes of patients with diabetes.

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OnNovember 22, 2016, posted in: Home page feature, News by

Judith Davey Blog: Faith-based or Commercial? Promoting social value in aged care

When older people and their families/whanau are looking for aged care they have choices – commercial or voluntary/community sector? If we need residential care would we go for Oceania/BUPA/Ryman or look at Presbyterian Support/Wesleycare/Anglican Living. And what would guide our choices? What makes the difference?

In 2015 the New Zealand Council of Christian Social Services (NZCCSS) published Outcomes Plus.1 This examined the special contribution made by community and voluntary sector social service providers. What do they offer which is unique– their “added value” in other words?

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OnNovember 22, 2016, posted in: By Judith Davey, Home page feature, News by

Launch of books for people with cognitive impairment including dementia

Join Dovetale Press and Bupa at the launch of a set of books for people living with cognitive impairments including dementia.

Reading for many people is one of life’s pleasures – something they may have enjoyed for decades. So why should this stop because of a memory or language impairment? Specifically adapted by Dr Sally Rimkeit and Dr Gillian Claridge, and intended to continue and revive the pure joy of reading.

Date: Thursday 10 November 2016
Time: 6.30pm
Venue: Remuera Room, Ellerslie Event Centre, 80 Ascot Ave, Ellerslie

RSVP to communications@bupa.co.nz by 3 November.

 

View flyer here >

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OnOctober 31, 2016, posted in: Gerontology Events, Home page feature by

Physical and social environmental changes to promote walking among Dutch older adults in deprived neighbourhoods – the NEW.ROADS study

Source: BMC Public Health

Physical activity is important for healthy ageing, and daily walking is
seen as a feasible way to be active at older ages. Yet, many older persons, particularly in lower socioeconomic groups and residing in deprived neighbourhoods, are insufficiently active. Creating a physical and social neighbourhood environment that is more supportive for walking has the potential to improve walking behaviour. Current evidence of the impact of changes to the physical and/or social environmental on walking behaviour is scarce. The aim of the NEW.ROADS study is to design, implement and evaluate changes to the physical and social environment for the purpose of increasing walking behaviour among older residents of deprived neighbourhoods.

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OnOctober 21, 2016, posted in: News by

Mediterranean diet, cognitive function, and dementia – A systematic review of the evidence

Source: Advances in Nutrition

A growing body of evidence suggests that adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD)
may protect against cognitive decline and dementia. Many epidemiologic studies and several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have found positive effects of the MD on cognitive function, but findings remain inconsistent. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on the current knowledge of the effects of the MD on cognitive function, cognitive impairment, Alzheimer disease (AD), and all-type dementia.

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OnOctober 21, 2016, posted in: News by

Motivators and barriers for older people participating in resistance training – A systematic review

Source: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity

Regular participation in resistance training is important for older people to maintain their health and independence, yet participation rates are low. The study aimed to identify motivators and barriers to older people participating in resistance training.

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OnOctober 21, 2016, posted in: Home page feature, News by

Older peoples’ unmet needs result in lower quality of life

Source: University of Auckland

Older New Zealanders with unmet needs have a lower quality of life, according to new research from the University of Auckland.

Research that examined socioeconomic and cultural profiles and correlates of quality of life in non-Māori New Zealanders of advanced age, found that despite these challenges, a higher proportion of women reported they can count on someone to help with daily tasks, (83 percent vs 77 percent in men).

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OnOctober 20, 2016, posted in: Home page feature, News by

NZ needs radical overhaul on dementia care

Source: NewsHub

A global report warns that countries like New Zealand are unprepared for a surge in dementia cases.

The latest World Alzheimer Report says half of dementia cases go undiagnosed and there’s not enough focus on services and support.

The report makes key recommendations, including:

  • Continuous, holistic and integrated healthcare for people with dementia;
  • Increasing the role of primary care services to increase diagnosis and continuing care;
  • Introducing care pathways to improve standards and tackle the lottery dementia patients and their carers experience in accessing care and support;
  • More investment into research on cost-effective care;
  • Prioritising the search for new treatments.

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OnOctober 20, 2016, posted in: Home page feature, News by